#Review – The New Hacker’s Dictionary

bogosity /boh-go’s*-tee/ n.

 

  1. [orig. CMU, now very common] The degree to which something is bogus. Bogosity is measured with a bogometer; in a seminar, when a speaker says something bogus, a listener might raise his hand and say “My bogometer just triggered”. More extremely, “You just pinned my bogometer” means you just said or did something so outrageously bogus that it is off the scale, pinning the bogometer needle at the highest possible reading (one might also say “You just redlined my bogometer”). The agreed-upon unit of bogosity is the microLenat. 2. The potential field generated by a bogon flux; see quantum bogodynamics. See also bogon flux, bogon filter, bogus.”

 

I love words. I’m always looking for new phrases and jargon, the more evocative the better. After I read Steven Levy’s Hackers, one of the things that stuck with me was how this group had developed their own language.

Every field of expertise has its own jargon. For hackers, though, English is just another programming language, just with looser rules. It’s a system. Hackers explore and manipulate systems, either to achieve a specific goal, see what happens or just to have some fun.

The New Hacker’s Dictionary originated in 1975 at Stanford as a simple file maintained by Raphael Finkel, collecting hacker jargon from various branches of the community. Like any language, ‘hacker-speak’ has dialects. The file was copied around the community, each group adding their own entries to what was becoming a shared history of the hacker culture. Eventually it was collected and published by M.I.T. Press and that’s when I got my hands on a copy.

Normally you don’t read a dictionary for fun, but this one is different. It’s a snapshot of a period of time that transformed not only my own personal and professional life but that of the world.

Consider this. The year the Jargon File was created, the very first personal computer was offered for sale.

It was the MITS Altair.

It came with 256 bytes of memory (expandable to 64K), had no keyboard or monitor and a single data bus. You had to key in your programs in low-level assembler code by flipping switches on the front panel one word at a time.

It sold as a kit for $297 (the case was extra).

Oh, yeah, I almost forgot. Microsoft got their start licensing software for the MITS Altair.

The year the Jargon File was finally published, more email was sent than postal mail in the United States and an IBM computer named Deep Blue became the first machine to beat a chess grandmaster.

The book includes a pronunciation guide, a guide to hacker writing and speaking style, a section describing hacker folklore and a guide to ‘J. Random Hacker’, which serves as a sort of spotter’s guide.

The words and phrases themselves range from layered and complex to playful and the book includes cartoons by Guy L. Steele, co-author and noted computer scientist.


Reference: Raymond, Eric S. The new hacker’s dictionary. Eric S Raymond. M.I.T. Press, 1996.

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